Turnips

Glazed Hakuri Turnips
(epicurious.com)   This recipe received 3.5 forks out of 4 forks for an overall rating with 100% of the reviewers stating they will make it again.  The recipe is written to serve 10.  Adjust ingredient amounts per the number of turnips you have on hand.

  • 3 bunches baby hakuri turnips, baby turnips, or red radishes (about 2 lbs.), trimmed, greens reserved
  • ¼ cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
  • 3 Tbsp. sugar
  • Kosher salt
  1. Place turnips in a large skillet; add water to cover turnips halfway.  Add butter, sugar and a large pinch of salt; bring to a boil.  Cook, stirring occasionally, until liquid is syrupy and turnips are tender, about 15 minutes.  (If turnips are tender before liquid has reduced, use a slotted spoon to transfer turnips to a plate and reduce liquid until syrupy.  Return turnips to pan and stir to coat well.)  DO AHEAD: Can be made 4 hours ahead.  Let stand at Room temperature.  Rewarm before continuing.
  2. Add turnip greens to skillet and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until just wilted, 2-3 minutes.  Season with salt.

Maple Glazed Turnips & Carrots

(nesfp.org/world-peas-food-hub/world)

12 oz. turnips
1 large carrot, peeled
1⁄4 cup chicken stock or water
2 Tbsp. butter
1 Tbsp. grade A or B maple syrup
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Scrub and peel the turnips and cut into quarters or sixths, depending on their size. Slice the carrot at an angle into 1⁄2 inch- thick pieces. Put the vegetables and stock into a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Cover and cook until the turnips are barely tender, about 7 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-high and add the butter and maple syrup. Stir to coat the vegetables and continue to cook uncovered until the vegetables are glazed and beginning to caramelize around the edges, about 2 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and serve.

Pickled Hakurei Turnips

I found this recipe from “Early Morning Farm CSA.” They indicate this basic recipe is also good for pickled beets (without the crushed red pepper – add some onions instead). It’s based, they say on David Chang’s base recipe for refrigerator pickled anything.

For each quart jar:
1 bunch hakurei turnips, greens removed (save them for sauteeing!) and thinly sliced
1 cup warm as it will come out of the tap water
½ cup rice vinegar (white wine vinegar could be substituted)
optional: 1 tablespoon crushed red pepper
6 Tablespoons sugar
2 ¼ teaspoons salt
Pack the sliced turnips into a quart jar, leaving about one inch of room at the top.
Dissolve sugar and salt in the warm water, and add vinegar.
Pour the liquid mixture over the top.
Refrigerate for 24 hours and serve.

Roasted Hakurei Turnips with Israeli Couscous Salad

From noteatingoutinny.com (makes 3-4 servings)
1 bunch hakurei turnips with fresh-looking greens
1/4 cup chopped red onion
1 cup Israeli couscous
juice from half a lemon
1 garlic clove, minced
4-5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
pinch of optional red chili flakes
salt and pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Trim radishes from greens leaving a small stub of the stems attached. Wash both well to remove dirt. Halve each turnip, keeping the long tails intact. Finely chop the greens.

Toss the turnips with 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil, pinches of salt and pepper, and the optional chili flakes. Place flat-side-down on a roasting pan. Roast for 5-10 minutes, or just until the bottoms are lightly browned. Toss around in the pan with tongs, and continue roasting other 3-5 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool.

Meanwhile, bring a pot of 3 cups water to a bowl and add the couscous. Continue to boil for 8-10 minutes until couscous is tender. Drain.

Heat 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high flame and add the garlic. Once fragrant, toss in the leaves and a pinch of salt and pepper. Sautee until just wilted, 1-2 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and let cool.

Combine the chopped onion with the cooled couscous and greens. Add fresh lemon juice, an extra tablespoon or so of olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste. Serve with the roasted radishes on top.

Roasted Winter Vegetables

We have found that our favorite way to have celeriac is roasted with other vegetables. It’s mild, rich flavor is a nice addition to roasted vegetables. Peel its tough outer skin before cutting. Following is a basic recipe for any combination of winter veggies. Peeled garlic cloves are also a great thing to add.

6-8 cups winter vegetables: potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, turnips, parsnips, rutabagas, beets, winter squash, celeriac (peeled and cut in 1- inch pieces or slices ½ inch thick).
2 tablespoons oil
1 tablespoon dried or 3 tablespoons fresh herbs such as rosemary, thyme, parsley, oregano

Toss ingredients together (keep onions separate, as they will roast faster; add them to the pan 10 minutes into the baking time). Spread in a single layer on greased baking pans. Roast in a preheated oven at 425 until tender, 30-45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Season with salt and pepper.

Sauteed Hakurei Turnips with Greens

1 bunch hakurei turnips with greens
½ Tablespoon olive oil
½ Tablespoon butter
Salt and pepper to taste
¼ cup white wine

Rinse the turnips and greens well. Cut the greens from the turnips and chop into 2-inch pieces. Trim any straggly roots from the turnips and discard. Cut the turnips into quarters or eighths, depending on size.

In a sauté pan with a lid, heat the olive oil and butter. Add the turnips, sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper, and sauté until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Remove the turnips from the pan. Add the greens to the pan, along with any moisture still clinging to the leaves. Cover the pan and allow the greens to cook, stirring once or twice, until just tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Add the white wine and cook until almost all the liquid is gone. Return the turnips to the pan; cook 1 to 2 minutes to heat through. Serve immediately.