Week #14 Tuesday, September 11 – Saturday, September 15, 2018

Farm News

Harvesting.  Our work these days is harvesting.  Garden clean-up too, but mostly harvesting with plenty of digging and picking and washing and even some bunching.  We did make some hay over the weekend, about a hundred and fifty bales or so, that we’ll use next spring.  We’d been waiting for a break in the rain for haymaking and finally we got it.  This time of year you need a good four day stretch between mowing and baling for the hay to dry. That’s been hard to come by – until the end of last week. It’s been quite a stretch of sunny and warm so we took advantage of it to slip in a little haymaking. We know we’ll be grateful in the spring to have it on hand.

Saturday, along with a great crew of pickers and packers, the bee team arrived to harvest honey. Brenda and Bob and Janet suited up and headed out to the hives about the same time we all began cleaning onions, bagging carrots and washing peppers. Spring Hill has two hives that sit at the far end of the valley and Spring Hill’s Bee Team of Brenda, Bob, Janet, Cathy, Cindy and Maria have tended them throughout the season. We often see the honeybees doing their work in the zucchini and cucumbers and raspberries. This fall they’ve been thick in the flowering fields of buckwheat. What a treat to watch them! Brenda’s been doing the coordinating of beekeepers and bee tending and Bob has lent his expertise to the crew. A huge thanks to the team for their work and enthusiasm.  I think we’ll have at least a couple of the team on hand at our fall work day to answer your questions about bees and beekeeping! 

On the home front, we’ve been working to get some food on the shelves and in the freezer for the winter.  We celebrated Claire and Wyatt’s (our twin grandbabies) first birthday and David’s (our son) twenty-seventh.  How did that happen??

In Your Bag

Russet Potatoes
Carrots
Yellow onions
Garlic
Cauliflower
Broccoli
Sweet Peppers  yellow & red – both long & tapered
Poblano Peppersdark green, tapered
Jalapeno Pepper
Roma Tomatoes/Tomatoes
Rainbow Chard
Cilantro

Coming Soon

Leeks and winter squash next week!  We’ll probably have carrots and pretty peppers too.

Next Week’s Harvesters

Tuesday,September 18  Janet Peters & Alan Torborg, Mary Yee, Candace & Dan Barras, Conrad Sowder, Mary & Brian Green

Saturday, September 22  Amy Votava & David Hemphill, Jess Nelson & Joe Slag, Shannon O’Brien, Kristin & Brendon Dennewill, Anne Holzinger & Sue Illg

Week #13 Tuesday, September 4 – Saturday, September 8, 2018

Farm News

People often ask us what’s done well this year and what’s been a challenge.  In the “done well” column this year, we could put broccoli – for sure the spring crop.  Peppers have done really well too as have tomatoes.  It looks to be a bumper of a winter squash crop.  Actually the vining crops generally thrived.  You may have noticed that with the cucumbers.   We are very happy to report that the garlic crop was a success which means we’ll have a nice batch for seed this fall.  

In the “bust” column, I’d put peas and spinach.  That hot dry spell in May/early June did not do them any favors.  We tried a new beet variety, Boro, that did not do well for us.  We’ll go back to our Early Wonder Tall Top.  Eggplant was another bust.  We tried a new variety there too and it just did not produce well.  

Another question we’re often asked is, “What are you growing that’s new?”  Sometimes it’s a new crop and sometimes it’s a new variety.  This year we tried and failed with Romanesco, a cauliflower-like crop that’s lime green with pointed, spiraled pinnacles.  Who could resist that in the seed catalog?  I can report that the deer LOVED it!  And that’s all I know about it.  We are also growing something known as cutting celery seed or leaf celery.  A farmer friend gave us some last fall and we chopped it up, froze it, and added it to soups all winter long.  Look for it later this fall.  Black Spanish radishes fall into that same category.  They’re in the ground and growing but not ready for tasting yet.  Look for them in one of the October bags.  Other new things were varietal choices.  We tried a new yellow bean and we were pleased with how it did both in terms of yield and flavor.  We’re just about to harvest the Romano beans so the jury is still out on that one.  It has a rather strange growing habit as though it can’t decide if it’s a bush bean or a pole bean.  As always some winners and some losers and always interesting.

In Your Bag

Cabbage
Melon  (sugar cube – small & sweet – last of the season) 
Carrots
Yellow onions
Garlic
Cucumbers
Cauliflower
Eggplant OR Broccoli OR 2ND Cauliflower
Sweet Peppers  yellow & red – both long & tapered
Bell Pepperred & green
Shishito Peppersgreen & red & wrinkly
Tomatoes
Roma Tomatoes

Coming Soon

Looks like the Romano beans and cilantro are going to wait a week before being ready.  I had been predicting this week but it looks like they’ll be coming along next week.  We should have more red and yellow peppers for you and some poblano peppers too.  Winter squash is coming along nicely so look for that soon.  We’ll probably have cauliflower and broccoli and maybe Rainbow chard. 

Next Week’s Harvesters

Tuesday,September 11  Kathy Steinberger & Jim Young, Cindy Hilmoe, Angela Gustafson, Divya Karan & Vinay Gidwani, Heather and Brett Struwe

Saturday, September 15  Karen Ansbaugh/Barb Ryan, Leah & Paul Robinson, Janice Kovala,  Heidi & Joseph Flores, Annalyse and Lucas Dazinger

Week #12 Tuesday, August 28 – Saturday, September 1, 2018

Farm News

We’ve gone from working in extremely dry soils to working in mud.  Friday brought us 2.7 inches of rain.  Sunday morning gave us an additional couple of tenths and then a storm on Sunday night/Monday morning dumped another ¾” of rain on the fields.  There was a little bit of hail with that one and we can see the result of that in the Rainbow Chard we were hoping to send this week.  We’ll now have to wait and see how much recovery time the chard needs.  We’re pushing four inches of rain in the last three days and it looks like there’s more coming tonight and tomorrow.  All this rain has made harvesting a challenge as we attempt to dodge thunderstorms and avoid being in the gardens when it’s extremely wet and muddy.  It’s just not that great for the soil, the plants or the humans.  We have now determined that the irrigation pipes and pump can officially be tucked away for the season.  Once it dries out, we’d like to get one more planting of greens in but otherwise just about everything has well established root systems and will do just fine with the soil moisture that’s there. 

We received some exciting news this past week that Spring Hill Community Farm has been approved to be part of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)’s Monarch Butterfly Habitat Development Program.  The program is about ensuring that monarchs (and other pollinators) have the habitat they need as they migrate from Mexico to Canada and back again.  Ten states have been targeted from Texas to Minnesota and Wisconsin.  Next spring we’ll be planting a little over an acre with milkweed and other nectar rich plants.  The USDA will provide us with financial and technical assistance.  Several of our neighbors are also participating in the program which means we can all learn from each other.  I know many of you are monarch experts and enthusiasts.  We’d love to hear from you.  We’ll keep you posted on the progress of this project!

In Your Bag

Satina Yellow Potatoes
Sugar cube melons – petite and flavorful
Red Tropea onions  & Yellow onions
Beets
Garlic
Wax beans
Cucumbers OR Eggplant
Peppers  Sweet Yellow & Sweet Red – both long & tapered
Shishito Peppers – green & red & wrinkly
Arugula OR Rainbow Chard
Tomatoes
Roma Tomatoes

Coming Soon

A cabbage and carrots will be coming your way next week.  We’ll have salsa fixins again – tomatoes, bell peppers, jalapeno peppers,  and cilantro (I’m hoping).
We’ve got another batch of broccoli that will be ready fairly soon and some cauliflower too.  We’re keeping an eye on the Romano beans, they won’t be long!

Next Week’s Harvesters

Tuesday,September 4  Leilani Hotaling, Stacie Warejoncas, Randi Roth & Mike Bander   NEED TWO!!

Saturday, September 8  Peg LaBore & Myrna Tautant/Rosemarie Merrigan, Christi & Tim Anderson, Sara & Blake Christianson, Courtney & Andrew Billing, Michelle Grabowski/Jose & Mateo Hernandez 

Week #11 Tuesday, August 21 – Saturday, August 25, 2018

Farm News

Golden rod in full bloom, sweet red and yellow peppers ready to pick, onions curing in the greenhouse, a touch of red in the sumac, cool nights, talk of the state fair and students returning to school; it would be hard to deny that fall is creeping its way down the road.  I have no idea where summer went.  It’s a blur that began with a late April snowstorm, a frantic game of garden catch-up, long days of hard work and good eating and now, all of a sudden it seems, summer is coming to an end.  There’s still plenty of work to do and good eating to be had, but there’s definitely a shift happening. 

We did get some rain last Thursday, a very localized storm that brought us ½ inch or so of rain and with it the buckwheat cover crop has jumped, the newly planted fall greens and turnips germinated and the carrots swelled.  We needed that one!  And now, some dry air would be appreciated.  The high humidity of the last week has plant disease written all over it.  We just lost a planting of basil to basil downy mildew which UW-Madison tells us, “thrives in humid, warm environments and can spread rapidly, decimating an entire basil crop.”  Yes indeedy it does.   UW Madison also tells us there’s no known cure and, in response to the question, how to avoid it, they suggest avoiding planting sweet basil.  Not an option!  We’ve got another planting just about ready for harvest which we hope will avoid the yucky stuff.   

This week, with the help of farm members and Erin and Micah, we began “boxing up” the garlic in the greenhouse to make room for the onions.  On Saturday and again on Monday we gathered up the yellow and red onions from the field and brought them into our shade covered greenhouse.  It feels good to have them safely tucked away and ready to be sorted and cleaned up each Tuesday and Saturday.   Love that!

In Your Bag

Purple Majesty Potatoesmaybe a few yellows too. Check these purple potatoes out – gorgeous!
Sugar cube melons – petite and flavorful
Fresh onions
Carrots
Garlic
Eggplant
Wax beans
Peppersthe dark green ones are poblanos and we’ve got a sweet yellow and red pepper for you too!
Collard greens (a few appearance issues, but very tasty!)
Tomatoes
Roma Tomatoes
Parsley

Coming Soon

Shishito peppers next week we think and likely beets as well.  We’ll have more roma tomatoes, and either arugula or rainbow chard.  A cabbage may make an appearance and we’ll see what else is ready!

Next Week’s Harvesters

Tuesday, August 28  Shelley Thron/Karen Melander, Anne Holzinger & Caron Moore, Harley Gee, Sara Nagler, NEED TWO MORE!!
Saturday, September 1  Koehler family, Carrie Pomeroy, Kate Kysar, DeGeorgeo family, Forrest family

Week #10 Tuesday, August 14 – Saturday, August 18, 2018

Farm News

So those onions all got pulled up on Saturday! They’re field curing at the moment, soon to make their way up to the greenhouse. But first we have to make room! That will be this week’s project. We plan to get set-up up for clipping and sorting and boxing up garlic on Tuesday and on Saturday working our way slowly but surely through the garlic. Once the benches are cleared of garlic, the onions can take over! 

It’s still dry out there so we’re continuing to irrigate the young stuff. We did get a bit of rain which was lovely for everything but particularly nice for the cover crop which had been waiting for just such an event. The birds were enjoying the seed, but we’re happy to see it now not only having germinated but growing nicely. 

We snuck away for day at the big lake –Superior that is – last week. What a treat to be on the lake. We have a few regular stops when we head north, the beach being the primary one but also Halvorson’s Fish Shop in Cornucopia for smoked white fish and often Ehler’s General Store for a treat of some kind. This trip it was ice cream. As we meandered our way north, we noticed a sign for the Spooner Agricultural Research Station and decided to drive by to take a peek. That led to getting out of the car and wandering around which led to chatting with the people that worked there which led to an informal tour. The station is run by the UW-Madison system and, along with other agricultural research, is currently part of trialing vegetable crops for the Seed to Kitchen Collaborative. This project is bringing together seed breeders, growers and chefs to “bring flavor back into fresh market vegetables,” a worthy goal, we think! They’re trialing some winter squash, melon, cucumber and tomato varieties at the Spooner Station. There’s also a research plot dedicated to organic potato production and some very lovely display gardens, a cooperative project between the station and the master gardener volunteers featuring flowers and vegetables that grow in zone 3. It was an unplanned, delightful stop!

 In Your Bag 

Potatoes
Melon
Fresh onions
Carrots
Garlic
Zucchini/Summer squash
Cucumbers
Peppers
White Russian Kale
Tomatoes – lots of them!
Herbs – Pesto size bunch!

Coming Soon

I think the wax beans will be ready next week. You’ll also see some carrots in your bag too, I bet. Shishito peppers will arrive soon. Collards too. We’ll give you a break on cucumbers beginning next week. We’ve got one final planting which should be ready in a couple of weeks. Zucchini and summer squash are slowing down. We may get another week out of them, but that may be it for the year. Roma tomatoes may start next 

 Next Week’s Harvesters

Tuesday, August 21 – Cichanowski & Beitz family, Mary & Michael Vanderford, NEED 3 MORE!!! 

Saturday, August 25 – Sally Silk & Tom Wolfe, Laurie Reed, Bryna & Chris Wiens, Nesbitt/Westbrook family, Tony & Ashley Barnes, Blue/Koszalka

Week #9 Tuesday, August 7 – Saturday, August 11, 2018

Farm News
About a half an inch of rain came down on the farm over the course of the last week.  Not as much as we’d hoped for but a nice drink for the newly transplanted and seeded crops.  We’ll take it!

On this week’s list, we’ve got the onion harvest.  First step is to knock the onions.  Once we notice that a significant portion of the onion tops are falling over on their own, we head to the field with rakes and knock down (sort of a folding over of the greens) the rest.  We let them die back like that for a week or so.  Next step is pulling them.  We like to see that we’ve got a dry stretch in the forecast (which we do) and then we (typically with a group of farm members) pull the onions out and lay them out in windrows to begin curing.  Once the tops have dried down, we (again typically with members) pull the tops and bag them, bringing them up to the greenhouse to hang out with the garlic.  The shallots have already been pulled and the storage onions have been knocked down.  We’re hoping to pull and layout a bunch of those storage onions with Tuesday’s crew and we’ll continue to whittle away at the rest over the next while.  The onions are a great many hands job!

Tomatoes are coming in strong.  We’ll continue to send a carton for each share and we’ll send a box in of extras as long we there are “extras” and we have room available.  This year we’ve got Estiva, Geronimo, Jetsetter, Damsel, Taxi, Pink Boar, Jaune Flamme and Green Zebra tomatoes.  It’s a colorful bunch!

In Your Bag

Cabbage
Beets
Melon
Fresh onions – red tropea and white
Garlic
Zucchini/Summer squash
Cucumbers
Green beans
Peppers
Salad Mix  with a little kick!
Tomatoes
Herbs  cilantro bunch & parsley, dill, basil bunch

From Spring Hill member, Milo 
(son of Alex Fowler & Jon Black)

ODE TO FARM DOGS

I go to the farm every year and when I go, I go to see the dogs.  When I first met Sunny (the first dog at the farm), I just would follow him all day.  I didn’t do my chores because I was only like five.  I would go home and say, “I’m tired.”  My mom would calmly say, “Let’s go to sleep.”  Now, I know she was probably thinking, “We were the ones actually doing the work.”

The first time I met Wally, he was going into a mini pipe stream and drinking the water.  I asked Patty and Mike about this stream, they said it was fine, so I just laid off. I usually was begging for the dogs.  I bet Patty and Mike were like, “Sigh.  Here comes Milo.”  That’s my story about the dogs on the farm.

Next Week’s Harvesters:
Tuesday, August 14 – Karen Abraham & Ray Wiedmeyer, Russ Heuckendorf, Divya Karan & Vinay Gidwani, Andrew Koebrick & Christine Douglas, Myrna Tautant & Peg Labore

Saturday, August 18  Cassandra Herold & Martin Perkins, Rachel Brown & Lew Anderson, Nancy Dilts & Dan Philippon, Karin & Reed McEwan, Brian & Kathleen Devore

Week #8 Tuesday, July 31 – Saturday, August 4, 2018

Farm News
We got just one tenth of an inch of rain this past week so irrigating remains a priority.  Baby and adolescent carrots and newly seeded crops are on the top of the list for watering.   We did plant a bunch of cover crops this past week in anticipation of some rain.  It was good to get the cover crop in the fields where spring greens had been planted and harvested but it would be really nice for them to get a good soaking.  It’s very fun to see the buckwheat coming up despite the dry field.
We’ve been busier than you might imagine with planting.  The end of July, beginning of August tends to bring a little push for planting.  Not quite like spring, but enough, as we want a nice mix in the fall bags.  In the last week or so we’ve planted some arugula, a spicy salad mix and cilantro and we’ve transplanted rainbow chard, fennel and basil.  This week we plan to plant some watermelon radish, turnips and more salad greens.  They’ll all want water too so we’re hoping Wednesday’s fifty percent chance of rain brings us something! 
Of course no rain means weed pressure has slowed down significantly so we’re feeling caught up in that regard.  We made enough hay to mulch the raspberries (which are just starting to ripen) and the final planting of cucumbers which will vine out soon and benefit from the mulch. 

In Your Bag:

Kohlrabi, Broccoli (last broccoli until the fall!)
Fresh onions – red tropea and white
New Red Potatoes!
Zucchini/Summer squash
Cucumbers, Garlic
Green beans OR Eggplant
Peppers
Tomatoes 
Herbs – Cilantro, Dill

From Spring Hill member, Mary Yee
Potatoes don’t grow on trees, do they?

I am pretty sure my children never asked me this question but I wanted to be certain that it wasn’t sitting in some recess of their brains. So, on the first Spring Hill Farm work day we attended–back in, say, 2002–I jumped up when Mike asked who wanted to harvest potatoes. The three of us walked down to the field with a bunch of other people and started picking up potatoes. Mike had already prepared the way by removing the green tops and harrowing the field so that we could see the potatoes emerging from the loosened soil. It was like finding buried treasure. We picked and picked. I think we had mesh bags for the potatoes and deposited them in a trailer behind Mike’s tractor when the bags were full. I remember it was a beautiful, sunny day. Not too hot. We might have had slightly creaky backs, though. At least I did. Maybe not the kids with their supple spines. We definitely had dirty hands because we hadn’t brought gloves. When we walked back from the field, towards the packing shed, we found cooks preparing vast vats of vegetable soup over open fires. My son was not a fan of vegetables but that evening he enjoyed the soup. He had seen the leeks and carrots and potatoes being chopped and dropped into the tall pots. Somehow, that acquaintance made the soup palatable. And I was sure now that neither child was ever going to ask, “Do potatoes grow on trees?”

Next Week’s Harvesters:
Tuesday, August 7 – Steve Petermeier & Ann Peterson, Nicole Gallagher/Shelly Johnson,  Jacki Betsworth & Faye Fisher Ward,  Elaine Ess,  Sue Poore

Saturday, August 11  Doug Alecci, Shelley Thron & Shelley des Islets,  Brie Reed & Alex Ross-Stuart/Michaela Klein,  Kathleen & Mike Lauer, NEED ONE!

Week #7 Tuesday, July 24 – Saturday, July 28, 2018

Farm News
We started irrigating today.  We had the irrigation pipes out in May, put them away for June and much of July and today they’re back at work.  Many things in the field are fine.  They’re mature plants with good root systems.  They’re mulched and the mulch holds the moisture in even when it’s been dry for a period of time.  Field tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, melons and Brussels sprouts fall into this category.  But the youngsters out there need a little help.  We’ve got baby carrots planted just a few weeks ago that need a drink.  Some newly transplanted broccoli and kale and cucumbers will also need a shot of water.  If we don’t get rain mid-week, part of each day will involve moving those pipes around the farm, ensuring the crops are reasonably happy, hoping for rain – and very thankful we can irrigate when we need to. 

This week’s bag looks a little different.  We’ve made a definite move into the summer crops.  Tomatoes, peppers, fresh onions, cilantro – it’s fresh salsa time!  We had our first batch a few days ago and what a treat that was.  For me, that is summer.  New potatoes, eggplant, green beans are also summer favorites.  We recently made some marinated eggplant, zucchini, onions and tomatoes.  The inspiration came from Katy and Larry’s cooking videos on Spring Hill’s web site.  Those videos are an amazing resource for all of us.  You’ll find them under the “recipe” section of Spring Hill Community Farm’s web site: https://www.springhillcommunityfarm.com/cooking-videos/ .  Along with the eggplant video there’s one for new potatoes with Indian spices, another for spicy beans, one for Moroccan carrots, carrot pickles and many more.  It’ll be well worth your time to check them out!

In Your Bag:

Carrots
Fresh onions
New Potatoes!
Broccoli
Zucchini/Summer squash
Cucumbers
Green beans
Eggplant
Peppers – bell & jalapeno
Tomatoes
Herbs – Cilantro, Sage/Thyme bunch

Coming Soon
Likely a cabbage next week, maybe kohlrabi. 
Tomatoes and potatoes too!

Week #6 Tuesday, July 17 – Saturday, July 21, 2018

Farm News

We’ve been working on the garlic harvest this past week.  With the help of Erin and Micah and plenty of farm members, much of the garlic is laid out in the greenhouse for curing.  Tomorrow’s crew should come close to completing the task.  Many hands have made light work.  Yes!!

Today we picked the first of the green beans and the first tomatoes.   At some point bean picking will get old but today it felt good.  The eyes and fingers went right to work, spotting the beans, then quickly wrapping fingers around the beans and over time, filling the bucket and filling it again, an occasional one in the mouth for sustenance.  Mindless, mindful work –a number of our tasks fall into that category.  Beans for sure, carrot weeding, berry picking.  They require just enough concentration to keep the mind focused, but plenty of space for conversation or contemplation if you like.  

Our annual stand-off with the deer is at its peak.  The neighborhood deer have broadened their tastes over time from just beans and beets and lettuce to include most vegetables now.  It’s what you’d appreciate seeing in a growing child– that exploration of flavors–and not so much in the deer.  We currently have fences around cucumbers, beans, beets, broccoli/cabbage, carrots and melons with plans to fence in the Brussels sprouts as well.  So far the greedy critters are leaving the pepper/tomato/eggplant section alone and the same goes for the winter squash.  They’ve sampled onions and leeks but have moved on. 

The fences we use are powered by the sun though we have more fences than energizers.  Our plan is to keep them guessing about which fences have the juice, thus “encouraging” them to stay in the woods and on the edges of the fields where there really is plenty for them to browse thereby leaving the vegetables for all of you. 
Cross your fingers … and your toes!

In Your Bag:

Carrots
Garlic
Scallions
Broccoli
Zucchini/Summer squash
Cucumbers
Green beans
Lettuce
Arugula
Tomatoes  – just the beginning!
Mixed Herb bunch

Coming Soon

Look for some new potatoes soon!  Eggplant and peppers are coming along.  More beans and tomatoes!

Next Week’s Harvesters:

Tuesday, July 24 – Roger & Suzanne Dahl, Susan Schonfeld & Doug Hicks, Peter McAllister, Diane Clayton & Colleen Bell, Barnes/Carlson family
Saturday, July 28 – Marilee & Paul Tuite, Joseph Mitchell & Mache Holliday-Mitchell ,  Ian Young & Katherine Ingram, Marilyn Johnson & Dave Bostrom, Carolyn & Rick VandenDolder

Week #5 Tuesday, July 10 – Saturday, July 14, 2018

Farm News

The garlic harvest has officially begun!  We began by putting the shade cloth on the greenhouse in preparation for transforming the greenhouse from a house of growing plants to a home for curing garlic.   Mike hooked up the potato digger (or in this case the garlic digger) to the tractor and we all headed to the garlic patch to begin.  Garlic has remained one of our favorite crops to grow and each stage of its growth has become a marker of sorts.  Garlic tasks bookend the growing season for us.  In early spring we wait and watch (and worry), checking for the first green tips of the garlic plant to poke through the ground.  “Garlic’s up and looks good!” are often words that begin the spring growing season.  Planting garlic in the fall is the last big task of the year and marks the first planting for season to come.  And other things too.  Garlic scapes are often found in the first bags we send soon to be followed by fresh garlic and then cured garlic.  We may skip a week or two but most weeks, you’ll find Spring Hill garlic in your bag.  Garlic harvest inevitably occurs when it’s beastly hot outside and even hotter in the greenhouse where we lay it out for curing.  Getting to the other side of garlic harvest often feels like a turning point in the season.  There’s less planting to do and more harvesting.  Even cultivation, while important, becomes not quite so urgent at this time.  The early greens garden is typically about to be put to rest, beans are coming in and we can see that the summer crops (tomatoes and peppers and eggplant) are not too far off.  That feeling of running downhill begins to feel more like running on level ground; plenty to do but less frantic.

Ever freeze basil? You can puree the basil with olive oil (1 cup basil/1T olive oil in a food processor and freeze it in ice cube trays or plops on a cookie sheet.  Store your cubes or plops in a freezer bag or freezer-safe container and enjoy basil all winter long!

In Your Bag:

Carrots
Beets
Garlic
Scallions
Broccoli
Zucchini/Summer squash OR Eggplant
Cucumbers
Lettuce
Red Russian Kale
Big Basil Bunch

From Peggy Abram:
Why I Belong to a CSA?  
It’s been a trying day, I’m beat, feeling like I should order pizza and crawl under the covers. Anything in the fridge that could be dinner? Wrapped in damp paper towel some green lettuce and lettuce with red/almost black leaves…and piquant red radishes and enormous scallions too…salad done (or, should I add the kohlrabi too?).  I pull a pizza crust from the freezer, and find curlicues of garlic scapes to chop and saute, then add the tossled handful of radish greens and a bit of the deep green kale leaves too…the crust is readied with a layer of grated cheese, sautéed greens and scapes on top? VOILA! Delicious, fragrant, local, healthy, not to mention sustenance…I am revived by a multitude of CSA veggies!

This Week’s Bingo Challenge

Use a new part of a vegetable.  Try peeling your broccoli stems to make stir fry, saving your onion skins (or green onion tops) for soup stock, or using your kale stems as a compostable shish kabob skewer for the grill.  Get creative!

Next Week’s Harvesters

Tuesday, July 17 – Susan Conner & Sherman Eagles, Patrick & Sara Wright, Mary Dolan O’Brien & Clark Furlong, Sean & Mallory O’Brien, Poppele & Bergerson, Brenda Beyer 

Saturday, July 21 – Noah & Jess Holm , Ian Whitney & Laura Murphy, Amy & Lee Friedman, Liz Farrell, Marilee Light & Katie Aafedt